Glen-Marie Frost, glamorous PR executive, went from living in Bellevue Hill to homelessness

A glamorous PR guru has unveiled how she went from dwelling in just one of Australia’s most exclusive suburbs to sleeping in her auto. 

Glen-Marie Frost, 73, instructed a NSW parliamentary inquiry on Monday that she was a dwelling example of how homelessness could happen to any one. 

The govt when ran an intercontinental PR agency, had a position as the head of communications for the Sydney Olympics and lived in a sprawling mansion in Bellevue Hill, in the city’s exclusive eastern suburbs. 

Nevertheless, her glamorous life style arrived to an abrupt end immediately after a divorce left the savvy businesswoman with scarcely any property, money or a put to stay. 

Glen-Marie Frost, 73, (pictured) told a NSW parliamentary inquiry on Monday that she was a living example of how homelessness can happen to anyone

Glen-Marie Frost, 73, (pictured) told a NSW parliamentary inquiry on Monday that she was a living example of how homelessness can happen to anyone

 Glen-Marie Frost, 73, (pictured) explained to a NSW parliamentary inquiry on Monday that she was a living case in point of how homelessness can come about to any individual

Ms Frost (pictured with Kerri-Anne Kennerley) realised too late that her former partner, a wealthy property executive, had plunged the family into debt during the 1980s

Ms Frost (pictured with Kerri-Anne Kennerley) realised too late that her former partner, a wealthy property executive, had plunged the family into debt during the 1980s

Ms Frost (pictured with Kerri-Anne Kennerley) realised way too late that her former companion, a rich house executive, experienced plunged the loved ones into personal debt throughout the 1980s

Ms Frost realised as well late that her former spouse, a wealthy assets executive, experienced plunged the household into credit card debt all through the 1980s, leaving her with little to her identify. 

She then grew to become unwell and was compelled to shut her government coaching business, with spiralling debts triggering her to turn into homeless at the age of 64. 

Ms Frost informed the inquiry she was now dwelling in general public housing in the internal-city suburb of Wolloomolloo and was acquiring a pension. 

Even with acquiring a roof around her head now and a constant money thanks to the pension, the former government claimed it experienced taken her a long time to find her feet. 

She was compelled to rest in her automobile when she was no for a longer period ready to remain with buddies. 

‘I was also worn out to ring up the next particular person,’ Ms Frost claimed. 

‘The matter about remaining with mates is you do not know when you’ve overstayed your welcome’. 

Ms Frost (pictured on Monday) told the inquiry she was now living in public housing in the inner-city suburb of Wolloomolloo and was receiving a pension

Ms Frost (pictured on Monday) told the inquiry she was now living in public housing in the inner-city suburb of Wolloomolloo and was receiving a pension

Ms Frost (pictured on Monday) explained to the inquiry she was now dwelling in community housing in the internal-town suburb of Wolloomolloo and was receiving a pension

She advised the inquiry that considering that likely public with her tale much more than two several years back, dozens of girls were being contacting her 24 several hours a day, seven times a week. 

The females, some of whom have been previous journalists at big media stores, could relate to how the PR guru’s daily life had out of the blue spun out of control. 

‘Becoming homeless … has no discrimination,’ she mentioned. ‘Most of these women arrived from suburban, typical existence.’

She described she had come from a time when there was no superannuation, leaving her small to drop back again on right after she was compelled to close her business. 

Ms Frost instructed the inquiry that numerous girls impacted by homelessness were being not self-confident in disclosing their problem to pals and spouse and children. 

Now, the PR government turned marriage celebrant regularly posts pics from weddings, drinks with buddies and excursions to the salon. 

'Becoming homeless ... has no discrimination,' Ms Frost told the inquiry on Monday. 'Most of these women came from suburban, normal lifestyles'

'Becoming homeless ... has no discrimination,' Ms Frost told the inquiry on Monday. 'Most of these women came from suburban, normal lifestyles'

‘Becoming homeless … has no discrimination,’ Ms Frost instructed the inquiry on Monday. ‘Most of these females arrived from suburban, standard lifestyles’

Ms Frost counts Australian Tv set star Kerri-Anne Kennerley and hairdresser to the stars Joh Bailey as company close friends and routinely posts pics from their get-togethers. 

The inquiry into homelessness among the older individuals also heard from Bee Teh, who was recovering from cancer when she observed herself with nowhere to reside. 

Following sofa-browsing with family, she ultimately overstayed her welcome when her sister-in-law told her she had to depart.  

Ms Teh said she struggled to locate a rental, had no task and no cost savings, and was forced to snooze in the Campbelltown Healthcare facility carpark right before looking for assistance.

Ms Frost counts Australian TV star Kerri-Anne Kennerley and hairdresser to the stars Joh Bailey (pictured) as firm friends and posts photos from their reunions

Ms Frost counts Australian TV star Kerri-Anne Kennerley and hairdresser to the stars Joh Bailey (pictured) as firm friends and posts photos from their reunions

Ms Frost counts Australian Television set star Kerri-Anne Kennerley and hairdresser to the stars Joh Bailey (pictured) as business pals and posts shots from their reunions

She sooner or later secured everlasting lodging in Sydney’s interior west and received a job at the University of Sydney. 

‘A long-lasting house or long term residence is very recuperating,’ Ms Teh explained.

‘I just hope that there’ll be much less homeless people out and about because each rainy day or storm I believe of them.’

Homelessness NSW CEO Trina Jones said the state was in crisis and that social housing plan required to be regarded as as an critical service. 

‘Not an afterthought, but an investment that we commit to in a sustained way that can meet the present-day and potential demand from customers,’ Ms Jones instructed the inquiry.